Proscenium by Jonathan Kipps

We are delighted to open our new solo exhibition Proscenium by Jonathan Kipps in the windows of Camden People’s Theatre. We hope to see you at the private view on the 16th April from 6:30 – 9pm, which will include a special performance in collaboration with Stuart Bowditch at 7:30pm

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The windows at Camden Peoples Theatre (CPT) are an in-between space. Somewhere between interior and exterior they act as a gallery, albeit one the audience cannot physically enter. They are permanently visible to the world yet remain contained and separate from the hundreds of people passing each day. Directly behind each window is the performance space itself, a darkened room where people come to experience things.

The new work Kipps has installed in the windows draws attention to this notion of middle ground. He uses objects and wall based works to link the internal space of the theatre, the private (making) space of his studio and the CPT windows as a space for viewing visual art.

In two windows Kipps has hung large black and white prints to create a backdrop for a set of sculptural objects. One print shows the stage area inside CPT and in the other print Kipps presents an image of his empty studio. Block colour has been painted inside the remaining windows, which from a distance appear empty yet actually contain small objects.

“I became increasingly interested in the different speeds at which people could encounter the work: walking past, waiting at the traffic lights, whilst having a cigarette in an interval of a performance, from a bus etc. I want the work in the windows to operate on different levels at different distances. Some pieces require a much slower and more intimate viewing experience than passers by might initially give”

The title of the exhibition Proscenium (meaning: the part of the theatre in front of the curtain) is intended to shift focus onto the space of the theatre itself, bringing ideas relating to production and periphery into the limelight.

Originally from Southend-on-Sea, Jonathan Kipps is a Visual Artist currently based in London. Recent exhibitions include In The Making, Bonington Gallery, Nottingham, Duet, UCL Art Museum, London, The Village Green Biennial, China Shop Gallery Oxford and Overgrenzen, Loods 6, Amsterdam. Kipps also co-curates UNhyphen events (artists and musicians collaborating in unusual spaces http://www.unhyphen.co.uk) with Stuart Bowditch (www.stuartbowditch.co.uk) and is currently studying MFA Sculpture at Slade School of Fine Art.

http://www.jonkipps.co.uk

A Certain Slant of Light by Malina Busch

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thewindshow@CPT is delighted to announce Malina Busch’s solo exhibition A Certain Slant of Light from the 4th February to the 6th March 2014. We hope you can join us for the Private View on Thursday 20th February from 6-30 to 9pm at Camden People’s Theatre.

Malina Busch’s artwork explores the relationship between ephemeral experience, memory, and material. Using the physicality of paint, she considers the changes and shifts that occur in nature. A Certain Slant of Light will examine how the nuances of material touch can act as point of exchange between the artist and the viewer, altering the viewer’s perception of an artwork.

The exhibition will highlight Busch’s most recent series of three-dimensional paintings which bring together visual ideas found in sculpture, drawing, and printmaking. Made up of folded and pleated canvas structures in strong opaque colours that have been shaped, bound, and tied; these pieces reinvent the surface of painting in order to produce a new experience. She says of her artwork “for me, the surface of an object is a place where elusive moments can be transformed into tangible spaces. Each painted mark or folded crease suggests an action which has already occurred, but where its memory has lingered through the marks that it has left behind.”

Malina Busch received a MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art in 2011. Awards received include: the Joan Day Painting Bursary (2014), Double Elephant National Bursary for experimental printmaking (2013), and Henry Tonks Prize for achievement in drawing (2011). Her artwork has been included in exhibitions at: Jerwood Space, London; The Courtauld Institute of Art, London; Exeter Phoenix Gallery, Exeter; Beldam Gallery, Brunel University London; and Hush Gallery, Istanbul.

More examples of Malina Busch’s work can be found on http://www.malinabusch.com

Fancy by Robert Rivers and Sean Boylan 11 Dec – 6 Jan 2013

unnamedthewindshow@cpt is proud to present Fancy by Robert Rivers and Seán Boylan.

A collaborative conversation between Boylan and Rivers, Fancy explores the Jean Antoine Watteau painting L’Enseigne de Gersaint. Originally painted as a sign for the art dealer Edme Francois Gersaint in 1720, Watteau’s painting is executed across two canvases. Fancy moves between two divisions of windows that are split between two separate vantages.

Watteau’s painting occupies both the inside and outside attendance of space. Rivers supports this sense of presence with fabric pieces that move between the interior shadowy and smokey depths that entice and the wistful street that invites us into the image.

Boylan’s paintings focus our attention on individuals absorbed within the environment of Watteau’s original painting. However, stripping the specific and unifying setting from these characters, Boylan concentrates their attention to a now ambiguous space.

Surface texture and spatial theatrics animate the perspective of the space itself. Rivers’s fabrics move across horizontal and vertical planes of illusion, whilst Boylan’s paintings reveal characters somewhere in between coming into being or fading away. Both artists’ individual works distinctly use Watteau’s ethereal qualities, but adjacent to one another, an innate singular quality emerges.

Robert Rivers, born Guildford 1983. Recent shows include Premonitions TAP, Southend 2013, Big Dinner Limbo, Margate 2013 andThe Slade MFA Degree Show 2013.

Seán Boylan, born USA 1984. Recent shows include Saatchi Gallery and Channel Four’s New Sensations 2013, Right Ascension/Wrong Declension Old Tidemill School 2013, The Slade MFA Degree Show2013, and You Are There Performance Space London 2013.

Slade Graduate Painting at thewindshow@CPT

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Coming up at thewindshow will be our first collaboration with Graduate Painting at the Slade School of Art, UCL. From November 2 – 12, four Slade graduate painters will respond to the theme of ‘Colour’ for thewindshow exhibition space at Camden People’s Theatre. From November 12 – 19, another 4 Slade graduate painters will present artwork under the theme of ‘Drawing’. Then, from November 20 to December 2, thewindshow is delighted to highlight the Slade Print Fair with a display of prints from the Slade.

The Slade Print Fair is a pioneering initiative to celebrate print and printmaking to raise scholarship funds for Slade students. The Print Fair features prints for salde donated by Slade staff, students and alumni, and an edition of prints created specially for the Fair by Phyllida Barlow, Professor Emerita at the Slade. Invited artists have also generously donated prints, which are for available for sale in an on-line auction.

The Slade graduate painters participating in ‘Colour’ at thewindshow are Jennifer Campbell, Sarah Cameron, Lyndsey Gilmour and Aimee Sawicki

The Slade graduate painters participating in ‘Drawing’ are: Malgorzata Bany, Emily Hawes, Mathew Morris and Noga Schatz.

The Slade Print Fair runs from Nov 28 – Nove 30 at the Slade Research Centre. Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AE.

For more information, please go to http://www.ucl.ac.uk/slade/events/slade-print-fair

Sarah Kate Wilson at thewindshow@CPT

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The paintings created for the exhibition ‘Tinted’ are developments from an ongoing series of ‘durational paintings’ a term Wilson has coined to describe works that have a predestined ‘lifespan’. By ‘Tinting’ the light, the intensity of colours will continually alter throughout the day and be engulfed by night.

The use of ephemeral readymades such as gels and dollies conjure a lo-fi stained glass window. Made by hand in a higgledy-piggledy manner, Wilson challenges the hierarchies attached to traditional stained glass usually reserved for churches and other significant buildings. Coloured glass and intricate lead work is substituted for translucent pink, yellow and orange sheets of theatre gels and decorative gold and silver plastic dollies.

Sarah Kate Wilson completed her MFA Painting at The Slade School of Fine Art, London in 2010. Recent exhibitions include; Part Three: Oblique Exchange, APT Gallery, London, 2013; Uncle Vern’s Dog, Gallery North, Newcastle, 2013, A Wall is a Surface, curated by LeandaKateLouise, London, 2012; Jerwood Drawing Prize 2012, Short-listed, (Touring); Malerei; Painting as Object, (Touring), 2012. Recently she was awarded AHRC funding for her PhD research at Leeds University 2013-2017.

Mark John Evans at thewindshow

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Here are a few words by Mark about his upcoming show:

‘Art is born of the observation and investigation of nature.’ Cicero (106 BC- 43 BC)

 The window acts as a mediator, the link between the performance and the audience. It is a stage on which the performer performs, and which the audience view, an audience that are in the age of mass media and decipher imagery like Turing would, who flick through a glossy magazine, where the ‘now’ culture is all consuming, who are bombarded with high speed broadband, which overflows with information.

 This space offers great exposure, offering art to the masses in a forward and direct way. I am very nervous about this level of exposure, showing work in its infancy to a large number is daunting but also stimulating.

 This show at the Camden People’s Theatre has allowed me to exhibit a new body of work, which I feel is at the start of an investigation into a way of working that deals with the application of paint, the physicality of mark making, and has traits of ‘automatism’ embedded within it.

 As an artist, I have always been fascinated with visual culture and ‘the act of looking’ has manifested itself into these paintings which are exhibited at CPT. The works are populated with strong, striking figures, held within an environment which both references the narrative of the source material and the ‘gestural’ mark making style.

‘The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.’ Aristotle (383 BC – 322 BC)

Mark John Evans

www.markjohnevans.com